TE - Energy Technologies


Career prospects

Graduates of the Master’s in “Energy Technologies” work in research and development, management and production of energy systems and optimisation of the production, distribution and use of energy, particularly from renewable sources.

Shortage of STEM specialists (BASS, SECO / La Vie économique, March 2009)

Learning outcomes

The “Electrical Energy” option of the MSE trains developers, designers and operators of innovative systems to respond to the energy challenges faced by society from a sustainable development perspective.

By the end of the course, engineers will be equipped to design and implement intelligent production and conversion systems for electrical and hydroelectric energy, management of energy infrastructure, managing consumption and energy storage, using the full potential of the latest control-command-regulation technologies.

Market needs

In 2011, the Swiss Federal Council and the Parliament took a decision in principle to gradually move away from nuclear energy. Switzerland’s five existing nuclear power stations are scheduled for decommissioning at the end of their operating life, in accordance with technical safety criteria and production being substituted by renewable energy sources.

As with other fundamental changes that have been taking shape for many years, particularly in the international energy context, this decision requires a radical transformation of the Swiss energy system by 2050.

In order to achieve the objectives set by the political strategy for 2050, guarantee Switzerland’s long-term energy supply and meet its commitments on reducing greenhouse gas emissions, the country has a huge need for engineers specialising in the energy sector.

Combined with a lack of graduates in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) subjects, a study from the Swiss Federal Statistical Office shows that over half of the missing 4,348 STEM engineers are in the energy sector.

Skills developed

The aim of the Electrical Energy option is to train engineers who combine solid technical knowledge with interpersonal skills. There is a particular emphasis on the following skills:

  • Successfully implement new energy production installations using renewable energy sources
  • Implement standards and the statutory and administrative basis for all aspects of managing electrical and hydroelectric energy production installations
  • Analyse and manage the concepts associated with the construction, operation or improvement of electrical and hydroelectric energy production and conversion installations
  • Analyse the energy interactions and connections between the sub-systems of a complex installation
  • Design, scale and optimise systems linked to the conversion and storage of renewable energy sources
  • Configure, manage installation and validate solutions for distributed automation of energy production plants and transport and distribution networks
  • Develop or renovate new installations used to convert, transport or distribute electrical current based on the components available
  • Operate electrical energy production installations, estimate their performance and propose corrective actions or improvements
  • Develop or implement strategies to enable a power supplier or producer to maximise income in the context of the Swiss and European electricity market.

Target audience

This option is part of the MSE (Master of Science in Engineering) course, which is delivered by several Swiss UAS. It follows on from the Bachelor’s course.

It is aimed primarily at graduates of HES Bachelor’s programmes in InT and ETE or those with equivalent qualifications.

It will be of particular interest to people who want to develop skills in energy systems – with an emphasis on electricity – which can produce, distribute and manage electrical energy, while ensuring the energy efficiency, quality and safety of installations in accordance with environmental requirements.

Career prospects

Graduates who have taken the Electrical Energy option are equipped to tackle the challenges of energy transition. They might be employed as project managers in various areas of activity, such as the production and distribution of electrical energy, operating and services companies, engineering forms, equipment manufacturers and businesses that want to improve their energy efficiency.

Learning outcomes

The “Thermal Energy” option of the MSE trains developers, designers and operators of innovative systems to respond to the energy challenges faced by society from a sustainable development perspective.

By the end of the course, engineers will be equipped to design and implement intelligent production and conversion systems for thermal and hydraulic energy, management of energy infrastructure, managing consumption and energy storage, using the full potential of the latest control-command-regulation technologies.

Market needs

In 2011, the Swiss Federal Council and the Parliament took a decision in principle to gradually move away from nuclear energy. Switzerland’s five existing nuclear power stations are scheduled for decommissioning at the end of their operating life, in accordance with technical safety criteria and production being substituted by renewable energy sources.

As with other fundamental changes that have been taking shape for many years, particularly in the international energy context, this decision requires a radical transformation of the Swiss energy system by 2050.

In order to achieve the objectives set by the political strategy for 2050, guarantee Switzerland’s long-term energy supply and meet its commitments on reducing greenhouse gas emissions, the country has a huge need for engineers specialising in the energy sector.

Combined with a lack of graduates in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) subjects, a study from the Swiss Federal Statistical Office shows that over half of the missing 4,348 STEM engineers are in the energy sector.

Skills developed

The aim of the this option is to train engineers who combine solid technical knowledge with interpersonal skills. There is a particular emphasis on the following skills:

  • Successfully implement new energy production installations using renewable energy sources
  • Implement standards and the statutory and administrative basis for all aspects of managing thermal and hydraulic energy production installations
  • Analyse and manage the concepts associated with the construction, operation or improvement of thermal and hydraulic energy production and conversion installations
  • Evaluate and analyse the thermal requirements of installations and understand the notions of efficiency and yield
  • Design, size and optimise thermal energy (hot and cold) production, distribution and storage installations linked to industrial processes and combined decentralised electricity, heating and/or cooling production facilities that use renewable energy sources
  • Design, develop and implement systems to convert solar energy in electricity, heating or cooling
  • Develop and implement command and control strategies for hydraulic and heat production installations
  • Operate thermal and hydraulic energy production installations, estimate their performance and propose corrective actions or improvements
  • Improve the performance and energy efficiency of industrial installations and propose corrective actions or improvements

Target audience

This option is part of the MSE (Master of Science in Engineering) course, which is delivered by several Swiss UAS. It follows on from the Bachelor’s course.

It is aimed primarily at graduates of HES Bachelor’s programmes in InT and ETE or those with equivalent qualifications.

It will be of particular interest to people who want to develop skills in thermal energy systems based on sustainable development, resulting in energy savings and the rational use of energy, while ensuring the energy efficiency, quality and safety of installations in accordance with environmental requirements.

Career prospects

Graduates who have taken the Thermal Energy option are equipped to tackle the challenges of energy transition.

They might be employed as project managers in various areas of activity, such as businesses that produce and distribute thermal energy, operating and services companies, engineering forms, equipment manufacturers and businesses that work on improving the energy efficiency of other businesses or buildings.