InT - Industrial Technologies

Career prospects

Graduates of the MSE’s major in "Industrial Technologies" work in research and development, management and production of technical systems and business management in the industrial sector.

Learning outcomes

The “Mechatronics” option of the MSE meets the needs of the industrial sector by training research and development engineers with a “practical” focus, who can design, implement and manage complex industrial systems by combining electronics, IT, mechanics and automation with the aim of optimising performance and costs.

By the end of the course, graduates who have taken this option will be capable of managing and implementing innovative projects that combine several disciplines, working closely with specialists in each field. They are proficient in using the main design, planning, implementation and verification tools.

Market needs

An optimal combination of various technologies results in increasingly competitive products and processes in terms of precision, speed, interconnectivity, reliability, cost and environmental protection.

The progress made in the areas of production machinery (machine tools, robots, etc.), transport (aeronautical, automotive, railway, etc.), the biomedical sector (instrumentation, rehabilitation, etc.) and home automation are all clear examples.

Businesses that are active in these areas have an increasingly significant need for engineers who are capable of developing products and processes based on a mechatronic approach, which is essential for technology to evolve.

Skills developed

The aim of the this option is to train engineers who combine solid technical knowledge with interpersonal skills. There is a particular emphasis on the following skills:

  • Understanding the design of a mechatronic system as a whole, including its scientific, technological, economic and environmental aspects
  • Specifying, modelling and simulating complex systems, using standard market methods and tools
  • Studying and analysing systems to determine the choice of command and regulatory systems
  • Specifying, choosing and integrating automation components (sensors, motors, actuators, converters, programmable robots, CNC, IT platforms, etc.)
  • Understanding and assimilating the mechanical characteristics and environmental conditions of systems and meeting requirements in terms of ergonomics, reliability and safety
  • Communicating effectively with all specialists involved in the project, with an understanding of their language, approaches and difficulties
  • Managing test projects individually or as a team leader

Target audience

This option is part of the MSE (Master of Science in Engineering) course, which is delivered by several Swiss UAS. It follows on from a Bachelor’s programme.

It is aimed primarily at graduates of HES Bachelor’s programmes in InT (Electrical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Design Engineering, Microtechnologies, Industrial Systems, Management Engineering, Energy and Environmental Technologies) or those with equivalent qualifications.

It will be of particular interest to those who want to further their skills in mechanics, electronics, industrial IT and automation.

Career prospects

Graduates are research and development engineers with a very wide range of knowledge and skills.

These prepare them to take up roles such as project, product or production managers by equipping them to adapt to the diverse situations found in industrial settings.

Learning outcomes

The “Biomedical” option of the MSE provides technical training on the specific needs of the biomedical area in an industrial engineering context.

In particular, this option covers basic statistics that are useful in the field, in a broad context combining the basics of tissue engineering and medicine, with knowledge of electronic instrumentation and microtechnologies.

The option aims to develop skills that enable students to manage product, instrument and systems development projects and have them accredited.

It includes the regulatory requirements associated with medical devices to obtain CE marking through compliance with European directives or in some cases, FDA requirements.

There is a particular emphasis on the risks associated with the use of medical devices, for which risk analysis and management methods and tools are developed.

Market needs

Biomedical technology has only recently become a significant sector in the Swiss economy, but is currently growing quickly.

The sector consists of both small and medium-sized enterprises and leading international groups.

It is still emerging – and therefore innovating – as a mainly export sector of the economy. According to BioAlps, there are around 700 companies active in the field in French-speaking Switzerland. Most of the jobs available are linked to the Biomedical option.

Activite principale des societes en sciences de la vie en Suisse romande

*Main activity of life sciences companies in French-speaking Switzerland (BioAlps 2014 and Swiss Life Sciences 2013)

Well-being and health, coupled with the increase in life expectancy, are important social issues. Controlling costs in the health sector is a real challenge, particularly in light of modern medicine’s heavy dependence on new technologies.

Engineers working in the biomedical field must be able to combine technological skills with the specific challenges of the biomedical area.

Skills developed

By the end of the course, MSE engineers who have taken the Biomedical option will develop a unique set of core skills. There is a particular emphasis on the following skills:

  • Participating in the development of biomedical products, from specifications through to manufacturing
  • Transposing general engineering skills into the fields of biomedical instrumentation
  • Contributing to the technical aspects of diagnostic, treatment and post-treatment follow-up processes
  • Taking regulatory and quality requirements as well as the relevant standards into account in development (documentation, traceability, calibration, etc.)
  • Analysing and managing the risks associated with the use of the product and taking these into account during the development process
  • Communicating effectively with doctors and biologists, to be able to translate their specific needs into engineering terms and collaborate with them
  • Evaluating the performance of devices in relation to medical requirements
  • Adapting laboratory instruments and techniques to the biomedical field.

Target audience

This option is part of the MSE (Master of Science in Engineering) course, which is delivered by several Swiss UAS. It follows on from a Bachelor’s programme.

It is aimed primarily at graduates of HES Bachelor’s programmes in InT (Electrical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Energy and Environmental Technologies, Microtechnologies, Industrial Systems, Industrial Design Engineering and Management Engineering) or those with equivalent qualifications.

Career prospects

This option prepares engineers with a Bachelor’s degree to work in roles that reflect the diversity of the biomedical field, such as:

  • Engineer in a hospital biomedical engineering department
  • Sales engineer and after-sales technical services for targeted solutions
  • Research and development engineer
  • Engineer with expertise in market regulatory requirements
  • Operating theatre engineer for high-tech instruments
  • Medical imaging and nuclear medicine engineer
  • High-tech rehabilitation techniques engineer
  • Production engineer for biomedical devices and instruments.

Learning outcomes

The MSE “Embedded Systems” option is designed to help students acquire advanced skills in designing, developing and implementing embedded systems, particularly those that feature a close interaction between hardware and software.

By the end of the course, graduates are proficient in techniques that enable them to develop autonomous electronic systems that interact with their environment in real time, using sensors and activators.

Among other things, the methodologies studied cover aspects related to the reliability, safety, robustness and consumption of electronic systems.

These systems are found everywhere in transport, medical equipment, telecommunications, mobile equipment, home automation, electronics used for leisure activities, etc.

Market needs

The prevalence of embedded systems in day-to-day objects and the soaring development of the internet of things means that a lot of businesses now need to master these technologies.

Various studies have noted the increased need for engineers and specialists in the field of embedded systems.

The industrial fabric of Switzerland owes its success to numerous businesses that have been able to exploit niche markets in the fields of electronics and embedded and mobile systems.

Skills developed

The aim of this option is to train engineers in embedded systems, who have the following skills:

  • Designing and developing microprocessor systems
  • Designing and developing digital systems (FGPA, IP cores, etc.)
  • Designing and developing analogue and digital signal processing systems
  • Producing hybrid analogue/digital electronic circuits incorporating sensors and activators
  • Optimising systems to reduce energy consumption
  • Managing communications between embedded and fixed systems (RF, fieldbus, etc.)
  • Managing hardware/software co-design
  • Implementing a certification/accreditation concept.

Students will develop soft skills in addition to methodological, technological and systemic competencies.

Target audience

This option is part of the MSE (Master of Science in Engineering) course, which is delivered by several Swiss UAS. It follows on from a Bachelor’s programme.

It is aimed primarily at graduates of HES Bachelor’s programmes in InT and ICT (Microtechnologies, Industrial Systems, IT, Media Engineering, Information Technologies Engineering, Telecommunications, Electrical Engineering or Management Engineering) or those with equivalent qualifications.

Career prospects

This option prepares future graduates to take up hardware engineer posts in various areas, such as industrial or domestic equipment, instrumentation, aeronautics, automotive, space, mobile or Internet of Things (IoT) applications, as a:

  • Junior project manager
  • Junior team leader
  • Designer and developer
  • Hardware and systems architect
  • Quality engineer (hardware quality, validation).

Accordion InT Micro- and Nanotechnologies and Innovative Materials

InT - Micro- and Nanotechnologies and Innovative Materials option

Learning outcomes

Micro- and nanotechnologies will be even more prevalent in the future than they are now. Microsystems and innovative materials allow new industrial products and instruments to be manufactured at a faster pace.

The MSE Micro- and Nanotechnologies and Innovative Materials option allows students to acquire the knowledge they need to be proficient in this new emerging area.

Engineers who have taken this option will be able to use their cross-disciplinary understanding of the knowledge acquired throughout their course to apply it to the interdisciplinary field of micro- and nanotechnologies.

Market needs

Switzerland has long been known for its precision in “micro” level applications and is now moving increasingly towards nanotechnologies.

In 2012, for example, 21.8% of the applied and innovative research projects funded by the CTI (Commission pour la Technologie et l’Innovation) were in the field of micro- and nanotechnologies.

Various businesses in the watchmaking, biomedical, energy, electronics and chemicals sectors, among others, need to modify the properties of materials to improve their use and enable new applications.

Micro- and nanotechnologies and the development of materials are enabling these advances in all cutting-edge areas.

Recent developments such as MEMS (micro-electromechanical systems), functionalised surfaces and the internet of things, for example, also need new materials and micro- or nanotechnologies for further miniaturisation of various components.

A similar need for miniaturisation and growing needs for materials are evident in the energy sector, particularly for photovoltaics, renewable energies and energy storage technologies.

Skills developed

Proficiency in materials and micro- and nanotechnologies requires a multidisciplinary understanding of basic science.

There is a particular emphasis on the following skills:

  • Surface characterisation
  • Production of micro- and nanostructures
  • Functional surface coatings
  • Instrumentation for nano- and microtechnologies
  • Microfluids
  • Multi-physical simulation
  • Design of micro- and nanosystems.

Target audience

This option is part of the MSE (Master of Science in Engineering) course, which is delivered by several Swiss UAS. It follows on from a Bachelor’s programme.

It is aimed primarily at graduates of HES Bachelor’s programmes in InT (Mechanical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Industrial Design Engineering, Microtechnologies, Industrial Systems, Management Engineering, Energy and Environmental Technologies) or those with equivalent qualifications.

It will be of particular interest to people who want to specialise in the field of micro- and nanotechnologies and innovative materials.

Career prospects

Traditional industries have a high demand for the skills targeted in this option.

Examples include the following cutting-edge sectors, where market needs are growing strongly: production of functional or decorative coatings, watchmaking, medical, microtechnologies, packaging and microelectronics.

Graduates who take this option may also work in micro- and nanotechnology Applied Research and Development laboratories.

Accordion InT Production and Manufacturing InT Production and Manufacturing option

Learning outcomes

The MSE “Production and Manufacturing” option aims to train engineers with solid skills in the area of production and manufacturing, which can be split into the following three main pillars:

  • Innovative processes: improvements to traditional processes and development of new processes suitable for emerging materials, microstructures and additive manufacturing
  • Development and construction of efficient production machinery in both functional and energy terms, and adaptation of production chains
  • Production system: supply chain management and improvement of lean manufacturing.

Market needs

Contributing to maintaining cutting-edge Swiss industries is reliant on improving existing processes or developing new processes that are innovative, protective of the environment, less expensive, difficult to copy and more energy efficient, as well as meeting cleantech requirements and the needs of high added-value products (watchmaking, aerospace, medtech, etc.)

Improving productivity gains, flexibility, agility and responsiveness by improving the speed of market launch throughout the supply chain is a significant competitive advantage in a challenging industrial context.

Skills developed

This option aims to build theoretical and practical capabilities to:

  • Improve and develop innovative production processes
  • Design, develop and participate in integrating or constructing production machines that respond to new technical and environmental constraints
  • Implement and manage modern production systems.

Notions such as quality control, lean manufacturing, security, reliability, economics and ecology are an integral part of the skills developed.

New requirements are combined with basic skills to meet sustainable development needs by managing energy efficiency and the capacity to manufacture products with a limited environmental impact and reduced energy consumption. This reflects the new Green and/or Blue Factory terminology.

Target audience

This option is part of the MSE (Master of Science in Engineering) course, which is delivered by several Swiss UAS. It follows on from a Bachelor’s programme.

It is aimed primarily at graduates of HES Bachelor’s programmes in InT (Mechanical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Industrial Design Engineering, Microtechnologies, Industrial Systems, Management Engineering, Energy and Environmental Technologies) or those with equivalent qualifications.

This is also an attractive option for people who have already worked in industry for a few years.

It will be of particular interest to people who are keen to develop:

  • Advanced technical skills to manage the entire product life cycle
  • Project management and organisational skills, with a particular emphasis on the interdisciplinarity of technologies and humans.

Career prospects

Graduates may be employed as project managers in areas such as developing, managing, maintaining and carrying out expert assessments of existing installations, production and process management.

Career opportunities might include:

  • Methods-process engineer, manufacturing engineer, manufacturing technologies engineer or production engineer
  • Design engineer, analytical or simulation engineer, applied research and development engineer or method-product engineer
  • Quality and innovation engineer, continuous improvement or operational excellence engineer, QRM (Quality Risk Manager) engineer or Supplier Quality Assurance engineer
  • Lean manufacturing engineer, logistics engineer, outsourcing engineer or technical buyer.

 

Learning outcomes

Micro- and nanotechnologies will be even more prevalent in the future than they are now. Microsystems and innovative materials allow new industrial products and instruments to be manufactured at a faster pace.

The MSE Micro- and Nanotechnologies and Innovative Materials option allows students to acquire the knowledge they need to be proficient in this new emerging area.

Engineers who have taken this option will be able to use their cross-disciplinary understanding of the knowledge acquired throughout their course to apply it to the interdisciplinary field of micro- and nanotechnologies.

Market needs

Switzerland has long been known for its precision in “micro” level applications and is now moving increasingly towards nanotechnologies.

In 2012, for example, 21.8% of the applied and innovative research projects funded by the CTI (Commission pour la Technologie et l’Innovation) were in the field of micro- and nanotechnologies.

Various businesses in the watchmaking, biomedical, energy, electronics and chemicals sectors, among others, need to modify the properties of materials to improve their use and enable new applications.

Micro- and nanotechnologies and the development of materials are enabling these advances in all cutting-edge areas.

Recent developments such as MEMS (micro-electromechanical systems), functionalised surfaces and the internet of things, for example, also need new materials and micro- or nanotechnologies for further miniaturisation of various components.

A similar need for miniaturisation and growing needs for materials are evident in the energy sector, particularly for photovoltaics, renewable energies and energy storage technologies.

Skills developed

Proficiency in materials and micro- and nanotechnologies requires a multidisciplinary understanding of basic science.

There is a particular emphasis on the following skills:

  • Surface characterisation
  • Production of micro- and nanostructures
  • Functional surface coatings
  • Instrumentation for nano- and microtechnologies
  • Microfluids
  • Multi-physical simulation
  • Design of micro- and nanosystems.

Target audience

This option is part of the MSE (Master of Science in Engineering) course, which is delivered by several Swiss UAS. It follows on from a Bachelor’s programme.

It is aimed primarily at graduates of HES Bachelor’s programmes in InT (Mechanical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Industrial Design Engineering, Microtechnologies, Industrial Systems, Management Engineering, Energy and Environmental Technologies) or those with equivalent qualifications.

It will be of particular interest to people who want to specialise in the field of micro- and nanotechnologies and innovative materials.

Career prospects

Traditional industries have a high demand for the skills targeted in this option.

Examples include the following cutting-edge sectors, where market needs are growing strongly: production of functional or decorative coatings, watchmaking, medical, microtechnologies, packaging and microelectronics.

Graduates who take this option may also work in micro- and nanotechnology Applied Research and Development laboratories.

Learning outcomes

The MSE “Production and Manufacturing” option aims to train engineers with solid skills in the area of production and manufacturing, which can be split into the following three main pillars:

  • Innovative processes: improvements to traditional processes and development of new processes suitable for emerging materials, microstructures and additive manufacturing
  • Development and construction of efficient production machinery in both functional and energy terms, and adaptation of production chains
  • Production system: supply chain management and improvement of lean manufacturing.

Market needs

Contributing to maintaining cutting-edge Swiss industries is reliant on improving existing processes or developing new processes that are innovative, protective of the environment, less expensive, difficult to copy and more energy efficient, as well as meeting cleantech requirements and the needs of high added-value products (watchmaking, aerospace, medtech, etc.)

Improving productivity gains, flexibility, agility and responsiveness by improving the speed of market launch throughout the supply chain is a significant competitive advantage in a challenging industrial context.

Skills developed

This option aims to build theoretical and practical capabilities to:

  • Improve and develop innovative production processes
  • Design, develop and participate in integrating or constructing production machines that respond to new technical and environmental constraints
  • Implement and manage modern production systems.

Notions such as quality control, lean manufacturing, security, reliability, economics and ecology are an integral part of the skills developed.

New requirements are combined with basic skills to meet sustainable development needs by managing energy efficiency and the capacity to manufacture products with a limited environmental impact and reduced energy consumption. This reflects the new Green and/or Blue Factory terminology.

Target audience

This option is part of the MSE (Master of Science in Engineering) course, which is delivered by several Swiss UAS. It follows on from a Bachelor’s programme.

It is aimed primarily at graduates of HES Bachelor’s programmes in InT (Mechanical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Industrial Design Engineering, Microtechnologies, Industrial Systems, Management Engineering, Energy and Environmental Technologies) or those with equivalent qualifications.

This is also an attractive option for people who have already worked in industry for a few years.

It will be of particular interest to people who are keen to develop:

  • Advanced technical skills to manage the entire product life cycle
  • Project management and organisational skills, with a particular emphasis on the interdisciplinarity of technologies and humans.

Career prospects

Graduates may be employed as project managers in areas such as developing, managing, maintaining and carrying out expert assessments of existing installations, production and process management.

Career opportunities might include:

  • Methods-process engineer, manufacturing engineer, manufacturing technologies engineer or production engineer
  • Design engineer, analytical or simulation engineer, applied research and development engineer or method-product engineer
  • Quality and innovation engineer, continuous improvement or operational excellence engineer, QRM (Quality Risk Manager) engineer or Supplier Quality Assurance engineer
  • Lean manufacturing engineer, logistics engineer, outsourcing engineer or technical buyer.